Facebook post on urgency of picking next PM was to push 4th Gen leaders to respond: ESM Goh

Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong, on a Facebook post, highlighted the "urgent challenge" of choosing Singapore's next leader and said he hoped the current cohort would do so in six to nine months.
Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong, on a Facebook post, highlighted the "urgent challenge" of choosing Singapore's next leader and said he hoped the current cohort would do so in six to nine months.PHOTO: ST FILE

SINGAPORE - Emeritus Senior Minister Goh Chok Tong said his Facebook post last week on the urgency of picking Singapore's next Prime Minister was made "on purpose to elicit a response" from the country's fourth generation leadership.

"Having achieved my purpose, I'm not going to go further than that," said Mr Goh on Saturday (Jan 6), referring to a rare joint statement that 16 younger ministers from the ruling People's Action Party issued on Thursday.

The 16 office holders said they are "keenly aware that leadership succession is a pressing issue", and will pick a leader among themselves "in good time".

This came after Mr Goh's post on New Year's eve, in which he highlighted the "urgent challenge" of choosing Singapore's next leader and said he hoped the current cohort would do so in six to nine months.

Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong can then formally designate their choice as his potential successor before the end of this year, he added.

"Whoever is chosen, the team will have to work together, bring in others, and gel to form a cohesive fourth generation Cabinet," he wrote.

Asked about the joint statement which did not specify a time frame, Mr Goh said: "It can be earlier, it can be later... I'm not going to question them on what does 'good time' mean."

"But the point is, they've responded to the call that they have to decide very quickly," he told reporters at a youth awards ceremony in his Marine Parade constituency. 

 
 
 

Mr Goh said: "Otherwise, in our nature, we normally don't want to fight for the post. And they're not fighting for the post, but they have to decide who should lead them. That's the difference in politics between us and other countries."

"(In) other countries they elbow one another," he added."But we all do not have sharp elbows to get into that senior position. So I thought I should just signal to them to better decide."

Asked why he described political succession as an urgent challenge, Mr Goh replied that the answer "is very clear".