El Nino and climate change

Singapore on lookout for El Nino impact

The water level in Johor's Linggiu Reservoir, from where Singapore largely gets its raw water from Malaysia, was at 55 per cent in August 2015. During dry months, PUB ramps up production of Newater and desalinated water. PHOTO: PUB A cyclist wearing
A cyclist wearing a mask while riding along Gardens by the Bay East in October 2015. That year, a severe El Nino worsened forest fires in Indonesia and caused the region to suffer its worst haze crisis on record. PHOTO: ST FILE
The water level in Johor's Linggiu Reservoir, from where Singapore largely gets its raw water from Malaysia, was at 55 per cent in August 2015. During dry months, PUB ramps up production of Newater and desalinated water. PHOTO: PUB A cyclist wearing
The water level in Johor’s Linggiu Reservoir, from where Singapore largely gets its raw water from Malaysia, was at 55 per cent in August 2015. During dry months, PUB ramps up production of Newater and desalinated water. PHOTO: PUB

New system can better monitor the signs and alert agencies to dry spells

The notoriously difficult-to-predict El Nino weather pattern that clouded Singapore in a haze crisis four years ago could be back in some form this year.

But this time, the Republic will be better prepared for it.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on June 09, 2019, with the headline 'S'pore on lookout for El Nino impact'. Print Edition | Subscribe