Shining a light on gliding mammal of the night

Learn more about the colugo, a nocturnal species found in the rainforests of Singapore.
The sunda colugo (above), a tree dweller, is also called a flying lemur because the shape of its head resembles that of the lemurs of Madagascar.
The sunda colugo (above), a tree dweller, is also called a flying lemur because the shape of its head resembles that of the lemurs of Madagascar. ST PHOTOS: DESMOND FOO
Dr Norman Lim (above), a mammal researcher at the National Institute of Education, is leading a two-year study on how development in forested areas could affect the colugos' movements.
Dr Norman Lim (above), a mammal researcher at the National Institute of Education, is leading a two-year study on how development in forested areas could affect the colugos' movements.ST PHOTOS: DESMOND FOO
Below: A colugo, a nocturnal mammal, using one of the colugo poles installed on Mandai Lake Road.
A colugo, a nocturnal mammal, using one of the colugo poles installed on Mandai Lake Road. PHOTOS: MANDAI PARK HOLDINGS, DESMOND FOO

New study hopes to uncover secrets of elusive forest animal native to Singapore

The flying lemur does not fly, and it is not a lemur either.

In fact, it is a master glider, and a unique species of its own.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 09, 2019, with the headline 'Shining a light on gliding mammal of the night'. Print Edition | Subscribe