Science Talk: Dive into Singapore's marine environment to protect it

Young participants on a guided walk at Chek Jawa on Pulau Ubin before the boardwalk was built. Initiatives led by the community and backed by the Government, such as coastal clean-ups and the annual Pesta Ubin festival, enhance community spirit and a
The living reefs of Kusu Island. Under the Singapore Blue Plan 2018, which made recommendations to the Government this month, the protection of island clusters – instead of specific coral reef areas – is recommended for the first time to ensure that interconnectivity between habitats is preserved. Responding to the ground-up initiative, the Government has said it will see how it can work with the marine community to realise common goals. PHOTOS: RIA TAN
Young participants on a guided walk at Chek Jawa on Pulau Ubin before the boardwalk was built. Initiatives led by the community and backed by the Government, such as coastal clean-ups and the annual Pesta Ubin festival, enhance community spirit and a
Mangrove trees on Pulau Semakau. In the Blue Plan 2018, in addition to coral reefs – the main focus of earlier years’ recommendations – habitat types such as mangrove areas are also proposed for preservation.PHOTOS: RIA TAN
Young participants on a guided walk at Chek Jawa on Pulau Ubin before the boardwalk was built. Initiatives led by the community and backed by the Government, such as coastal clean-ups and the annual Pesta Ubin festival, enhance community spirit and a
Young participants on a guided walk at Chek Jawa on Pulau Ubin before the boardwalk was built. Initiatives led by the community and backed by the Government, such as coastal clean-ups and the annual Pesta Ubin festival, enhance community spirit and are crucial because openness in communication paves the way for public stewardship of natural areas, says the writer.PHOTOS: RIA TAN

Greater awareness, dialogue between Govt and community can realise Blue Plan's goals

Singapore is an island-nation, and the lives of many Singaporeans are intertwined with the sea. Every day, coastal and marine areas here are used by thousands of people, for work and for play.

The impact of these activities on marine ecosystems is significant. Yet, rich biodiversity still persists in our waters.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 18, 2018, with the headline 'Dive into S'pore's marine environment to protect it'. Print Edition | Subscribe