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Tangible gains

Taking the master's programme has helped Mr Vimallan to be a better scientist-practitioner in the fields of psychology and disability.
Taking the master's programme has helped Mr Vimallan to be a better scientist-practitioner in the fields of psychology and disability. PHOTO: CHONG JUN LIANG

A master’s degree from NIE helps Mr Vimallan Manokara be better at his job

Attaining a Master of Arts (Applied Psychology) resulted in multiple benefits for Mr Vimallan Manokara.

For instance, it allowed him to be registered with the Singapore Register of Psychologists, which is implemented and maintained by the Singapore Psychological Society.

The registration is not compulsory to practise as a psychologist in Singapore, but Mr Vimallan feels that it improves his professional standing as a clinician.

The 33-year-old, who has been working at the Movement for the Intellectually Disabled of Singapore (MINDS) since 2011, was also promoted, and his job scope was expanded.

Previously, his job focused more on clinical practice. Now he is an applied research manager/senior practitioner (psychology).

He drives applied research in the organisation, does clinical research in social services and engages in evidence-based practice to measure outcomes of programmes.

He says: “My current unique dual role requires me to deliver both applied research and clinical practice. Through the provision of thought and practice leadership, part of my role involves building capacity of evidence-based practice in my organisation and across the sector.

“This, in turn, has allowed me to have a greater impact in improving the quality of life of persons with disabilities and their caregivers.”

Mr Vimallan graduated in 2010 with a bachelor’s degree (honours) in psychology from the National University of Singapore.

To complete his master’s degree from the National Institute of Education (NIE), an autonomous institute of Nanyang Technological University, Mr Vimallan switched to working part-time in MINDS.

He says: “I am thankful for my experience during the master’s programme, as it has made me a better scientist-practitioner in the fields of both psychology and disability. The coursework, research and practicum components of the course have also helped me acquire important skills such as critical thinking, problem-solving and strategic planning.”

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