Prospects improve for private-school graduates 5 years on

Mr Andrew Yeo graduated with a private degree but could not land a job he wanted. He later pursued his master's at the London School of Economics and found a job at the Institute of Policy Studies. He tells those in private schools not to give up.
Mr Andrew Yeo was valedictorian at the Singapore Institute of Management. He then earned a master's degree in social policy and planning from the London School of Economics and Political Science, but still did not get a response for many of the gover
Mr Andrew Yeo was valedictorian at the Singapore Institute of Management. He then earned a master's degree in social policy and planning from the London School of Economics and Political Science, but still did not get a response for many of the government jobs he applied for. He eventually got a job as a research assistant at the Institute of Policy Studies. He then moved to a consultancy firm and subsequently, the Singapore Exchange Regulation.ST PHOTO: KELVIN CHNG

Despite initial bias, SIM's Class of 2013 finds employment rates and salaries do increase

In recent years, graduate employment surveys of students who take the private-school route have shown that upon graduation, they earn far less than their peers from autonomous universities and seem to find it harder to find full-time jobs. This has raised the question of whether private-school students have been wasting their time and money.

However, a study launched last year by the Singapore Institute of Management (SIM) to track the job prospects of their alumni, five years after they graduate, paints a different picture.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on February 24, 2019, with the headline 'Prospects improve for private-school graduates 5 years on'. Print Edition | Subscribe