Cambridge Assessment moves to tighten delivery, transport of exam scripts

Director of assessment Juliet Wilson says Cambridge Assessment is reviewing its procedures for examiners.
Director of assessment Juliet Wilson says Cambridge Assessment is reviewing its procedures for examiners.

Cambridge Assessment is taking steps to tighten its processes in the delivery and transportation of examination scripts, following the two cases of papers getting lost in Britain.

Its director of assessment Juliet Wilson said yesterday: "We have sent a reminder to all examiners to reiterate to them the importance of keeping scripts secure when they are in their possession.

"We are also reviewing our procedures for examiners and looking at the guidelines and instructions we give them."

This could include reviewing where examiners are allowed to mark scripts. Most scripts are marked at home by examiners, who are not employees of Cambridge Assessment.

The exams board is also moving towards more on-screen or electronic marking, which would reduce the risk of scripts being lost or stolen.

Since 2015, it has been working with the Singapore Examinations and Assessment Board (SEAB) to implement electronic marking, which involves scanning and marking papers using software that examiners have been trained to use.

The roll-out started with the N levels in 2017. Nearly 65 per cent of scripts across the N, O and A levels were marked on-screen last year.

 
 

This year, almost all papers will be marked online.

SEAB chief executive Tan Lay Choo said it has been exploring options such as scanning scripts here before sending them to Britain, or rethinking if there is a need to send the scripts if they can be digitised.

"The incidents may make us speed up some of the plans we have," she said.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 15, 2019, with the headline 'Cambridge Assessment moves to tighten delivery, transport of exam scripts'. Print Edition | Subscribe