MADE IN SINGAPORE VIDEO SERIES

Made in Singapore: Crafting leather for a living

Ms Addynna Azlinor's clients come from all walks of life - from polytechnic students to middle-aged uncles who request for custom-made fanny packs.
Ms Addynna Azlinor's clients come from all walks of life - from polytechnic students to middle-aged uncles who request for custom-made fanny packs.ST PHOTO: SAMUEL RUBY RIANTO
Ms Addynna grew up wanting to be a surgeon, but she found a new purpose for her deft fingers - crafting leather.
Ms Addynna grew up wanting to be a surgeon, but she found a new purpose for her deft fingers - crafting leather.ST PHOTO: SAMUEL RUBY RIANTO
In 2010, Ms Addynna started working as a floor manager in a cafe, where she dabbled in leather work during her spare time.
In 2010, Ms Addynna started working as a floor manager in a cafe, where she dabbled in leather work during her spare time.ST PHOTO: SAMUEL RUBY RIANTO
Ms Addynna works seven days a week in her studio in Race Course Road, painstakingly punching holes in leather and stitching it by hand. She does not own any machines and prefers to do it the traditional way.
Ms Addynna works seven days a week in her studio in Race Course Road, painstakingly punching holes in leather and stitching it by hand. She does not own any machines and prefers to do it the traditional way.ST PHOTO: SAMUEL RUBY RIANTO

SINGAPORE - She grew up wanting to be a surgeon, but Ms Addynna Azlinor found a new purpose for her deft fingers - crafting leather.

The 32-year-old was pursuing a degree in biomedical sciences but had to drop out in 2009 because of financial difficulties.

In 2010, Ms Addynna started working as a floor manager in a cafe, where she dabbled in leather work during her spare time.

A friend, who was a leather crafter, had taught her the basics of leather work and she eventually decided to quit and set up her own leather goods brand, Forest Child, in 2012.

Her clients come from all walks of life - from polytechnic students to middle-aged uncles who request for custom-made fanny packs.

''I want to make sure my leather goods can reach the masses - whether you are rich or poor, you can own something of good quality.''

Ms Addynna works seven days a week in her studio in Race Course Road, painstakingly punching holes in leather and stitching it by hand. She does not own
any machines and prefers to do it the traditional way.

 

''Here I am, not stitching a live body, but I am still stitching skins. I think I am happy.''

Discover the story behind the brand Forest Child in this episode of Made in Singapore.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 12, 2018, with the headline 'Crafting leather for a living'. Print Edition | Subscribe