Motorcyclist admits knocking into pedestrian, causing injuries including fractures to spine

SINGAPORE - A man failed to keep a proper lookout while riding his motorcycle and hit a pedestrian, causing injuries, including fractures to the latter's spine and right shin bone.

The motorcyclist, Ong Foong Meng, 67, pleaded guilty in court on Tuesday (Feb 4) to causing grievous hurt by riding in a negligent manner.

Some time before 5.30am on Oct 5, 2017, taxi driver William Loke Wi-Liam stopped his vehicle at a well-lit pedestrian crossing at the T-junction of Gambas and Sembawang avenues to pick up a passenger who had an e-bicycle with him.

Mr Loke, 41, then switched on his vehicle's hazard lights and got out of his taxi as he wanted to help the passenger load the e-bike into his boot.

The cabby was at the rear of the taxi when Ong's motorcycle ploughed into him.

Deputy Public Prosecutor Shen Wanqin told District Judge Ong Chin Rhu that at the time of the accident, the weather was clear, the road surface was dry, traffic volume was light and the roads were "sufficiently lit".

A nearby motorist who spotted the accident called for an ambulance at around 5.40am.

Mr Loke was taken to Khoo Teck Puat Hospital before he was transferred to Tan Tock Seng Hospital on Oct 12, 2017, where he was warded for 52 more days.

He was finally discharged on Dec 2 that year.

 
 

The court heard that after the accident, a rehabilitation psychologist observed that Mr Loke suffered from "hypervigilance and over-reactive symptoms" when driving on the road.

The DPP said: "The victim experienced difficulties in focusing while driving, and had occasional pain in his right calf and foot, for which he took analgesia and did stretching exercises."

Ong was later placed under arrest at the Traffic Police Headquarters in Ubi Avenue 3 on Aug 23, 2018.

He was offered bail of $5,000 on Tuesday and will be sentenced on Feb 10.

Offenders convicted of causing grievous hurt by performing a negligent act can be jailed for up to two years and fined up to $5,000.