Coronavirus: Singaporean to be charged over allegedly breaching stay-home notice after returning from Thailand

Mr Foo Ching Guan allegedly left his residence to meet a friend at Sengkang Central.
Mr Foo Ching Guan allegedly left his residence to meet a friend at Sengkang Central.ST PHOTO: DESMOND FOO

SINGAPORE - A Singaporean man is expected to be charged in court on Friday (April 17) over allegedly breaching his stay-home notice after returning to Singapore from Thailand.

He is the third person to be charged over this offence.

Mr Foo Ching Guan, 32, returned to Singapore on March 17 and was served with a stay-home notice from the day of his arrival to March 31.

As part of measures to reduce the risk of imported coronavirus cases, the Government had announced that from March 16, 11.59pm, all residents, long-term pass holders and short-term visitors entering Singapore with travel history to any other Asean countries would have to serve a 14-day stay-home notice. This was later extended to all travellers entering Singapore.

Those served with such a notice must remain in their residence at all times during the 14-day notice period.

However, on March 29, Mr Foo left his residence in Kreta Ayer Road and took a private-hire vehicle to meet a friend in Sengkang Central to settle personal matters, said the Immigration and Checkpoints Authority (ICA) in a statement on Thursday.

Following investigations and consultations with the Attorney-General's Chambers, Mr Foo is expected to be charged in court on Friday under the the Infectious Diseases (Covid-19 - Stay Orders) Regulations.

If convicted, he can be fined up to $10,000, jailed up to six months, or both.

Last week, two Singaporean men were the first people to be charged over allegedly breaching their stay-home notices in separate incidents.

ICA said it will not hesitate to take firm enforcement action against those who fail to comply with stay-home notice requirements.

 
 
 
 

"Besides prosecuting offenders under the Infectious Diseases Act and its regulations, ICA may also cancel their immigration facilities, where applicable," it added.

It also reminded all travellers arriving in Singapore to submit complete and accurate health and travel declarations via the SG Arrival Card.

Anyone who makes a false or misleading declaration may be prosecuted under the Infectious Diseases Act, and fined up to $10,000, jailed up to six months, or both, for the first offence.

Repeat offenders may be fined up to $20,000, jailed up to 12 months, or both.

Foreigners may also face additional administrative actions by ICA, such as the revocation of, or shortening the validity of permits and passes to remain in Singapore.

Members of the public can report information about anyone who fails to comply with stay-home notice requirements to ICA at the online form or call 6812-5555.