Singapore's tourism industry to tap sustainability, wellness and tech trends for growth

The Government will pump $68.5 million into the Tourism Development Fund, which businesses can use to explore new areas including sustainability.
The Government will pump $68.5 million into the Tourism Development Fund, which businesses can use to explore new areas including sustainability.ST PHOTO: KELVIN CHNG

SINGAPORE - Instead of waiting for world borders to reopen, Singapore needs to disrupt the status quo. For the tourism industry here, the next big moves lie in sustainable travel solutions, technological innovation and holistic wellness.

This was highlighted by speakers at the opening of the Tourism Industry Conference on Wednesday (April 7).

Minister for Trade and Industry Chan Chun Sing said the tourism sector here already faced disruption, even before the Covid-19 pandemic. For instance, apps were replacing tour guides, maps and travel agents, and virtual or augmented reality allowed people to enjoy immersive experiences without leaving home.

The challenge is how Singapore will prepare for the long-term future, Mr Chan said.

Sustainable tourism presents an option to seize growth opportunities, especially with tourists becoming more conscious about the environment and are looking for more sustainable options.

The Government will pump $68.5 million into the Tourism Development Fund, which businesses can tap if they want to explore new areas including sustainability.

"In terms of the abundance of land and natural landscapes, Singapore might not be able to compete directly with other eco-destinations," Mr Chan acknowledged.

But Singapore's progressive and transparent regulatory environment and strong intellectual property protection will make the Republic an attractive place for companies looking to test-bed sustainable tourism products and experiences.

Another strength is the vibrant public and private ecosystem here that will facilitate effective partnerships for businesses and workers to grow their capabilities, Mr Chan added.

Singapore Tourism Board chief executive Keith Tan said Singapore could find another niche in being a leading urban wellness haven, where wellness and beauty offerings and experiences are easily available in a busy modern city.

"Covid-19 has made wellness a top priority for all of us," he said, adding that a growing middle class, especially in Asia, will pay a premium for offerings that enhance their sense of well-being.

Some industry players are already moving towards that direction. Grand Hyatt Singapore, for example, collaborated with local activewear brand Kydra to launch a staycation package, Recharge Retreat, which offers a one-night stay with other benefits such as a set of activewear, body treatment at a spa, and a meditation session.

Mr Chan said the tourism sector should also leverage technology, such as by using it to create a unique experience for tourists and locals alike.

He said: "In a world where visitors are not constrained by physical boundaries, travel is no longer just about meeting or sightseeing, but the unique suite of experiences that it offers to visitors from pre-arrival to post-departure."

One example is how tour operators have developed innovative experiences such as the Niu Che Shui Murders launched by Tribe Tours. On this gamified hybrid tour, participants solve a series of puzzles around Chinatown.


Trade and Industry Minister Chan Chun Sing and STB chief executive Keith Tan at the Tourism Industry Conference on April 7, 2021. ST PHOTO: GAVIN FOO

To support industry players in their digital transformation, STB also launched its innovation platform, Tourism Technology Transformation Cube (Tcube), on Wednesday.

Tcube provides training courses and resources to pick up digital skills such as data analytics, and also provides consultancy and prototyping services for tourism companies that wish to refine their digital strategies. Participants can also get guidance from industry mentors through events and talks.

Mr Chan said the challenge for Singapore, moving forward, is how it can prepare for long-term success and reinvent global travel.

He said: "We are not waiting for a full reopening. Singapore is prepared to disrupt the status quo, transform our products and services, and harness our capabilities to capture the next type of growth ahead."