Changes in port limits and claims over the years

Malaysia's recent unilateral and arbitrary extension of the Johor Baru port limits goes beyond what it had claimed as its territorial waters, Singapore said yesterday. "Malaysia has never laid claim to these waters, or protested our actions there. Now, out of the blue, Malaysia is claiming these territorial waters that belong to Singapore," said Transport Minister Khaw Boon Wan. These charts illustrate the changes to the maritime boundary over the years.

In 1979, Malaysia published a map that claimed territorial waters which intruded into the port limits of Singapore. Singapore rejected these lines. It stated categorically that they violated the Republic's sovereignty and were not acceptable. PHOTO: MARITIME AND PORT AUTHORITY OF SINGAPORE

Malaysia went on to publish, in 1987, Johor Baru port limits following this claimed boundary line. It made slight amendments to these limits in 1999, and the port limits stayed intact for 20 years. PHOTO: MARITIME AND PORT AUTHORITY OF SINGAPORE

On Oct 25 this year, Malaysia gazetted altered Johor Baru port limits that encroached into Singapore's territorial waters, in a bid to unilaterally alter the longstanding status quo in the area. From Nov 24 to Wednesday, there were 14 intrusions by Malaysian government vessels in the area. PHOTO: MARITIME AND PORT AUTHORITY OF SINGAPORE

In view of the recent provocative developments, the Singapore Government yesterday gazetted an extension of Singapore port limits off Tuas. This tracks the eastern boundary of the 1999 Johor Baru port limits, and takes immediate effect. PHOTO: MARITIME AND PORT AUTHORITY OF SINGAPORE

 
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on December 07, 2018, with the headline 'Changes in port limits and claims over the years'. Print Edition | Subscribe