Build trust between communities: DPM

Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean and Minister-in-charge of Muslim Affairs Yaacob Ibrahim, with (from left) PPIS chief executive Mohd Ali Mahmood, PPIS president Rahayu Mohamad and PPIS adviser Fatimah Azimullah, at PPIS' 65th anniversary gala dinn
Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean and Minister-in-charge of Muslim Affairs Yaacob Ibrahim, with (from left) PPIS chief executive Mohd Ali Mahmood, PPIS president Rahayu Mohamad and PPIS adviser Fatimah Azimullah, at PPIS' 65th anniversary gala dinner yesterday.ST PHOTO: ARIFFIN JAMAR

This can help prevent extremist views from taking root, especially among youth, he says

Building bonds of trust and understanding between different communities can help to prevent extremist teachings from taking root, especially among the young, Deputy Prime Minister Teo Chee Hean said yesterday.

He urged Singaporeans to reach out to others outside of their own communities, saying this would encourage openness and interaction, and help build stronger community bonds. This, he said, could also help prevent young people from being influenced by extremist ideology.

Speaking at the Singapore Muslim Women's Association (PPIS) 65th anniversary gala dinner, Mr Teo said: "One event that has disturbed me here in Singapore recently... is that for the first time, we have had to deal with women, young women, becoming affected by extremist ideologies. We must do our best to prevent the young from being led astray in this way."

In June this year, Singaporean Syaikhah Izzah Zahrah Al Ansari, 22, a contract infant-care assistant, became the first woman to be detained under the Internal Security Act for radicalism.

"We need to recognise the danger of exclusivist teachings to our social cohesion, and the threat that violent extremist ideology poses to our peace and security. And so, we must reject exclusivist and extremist teachings and not let them take root here in multicultural, multi-religious Singapore," said Mr Teo.

In his speech, he praised the PPIS for its efforts in reaching out to other communities. For example, the PPIS organised a celebration with the Taoist Mission, the Singapore Council of Women's Organisations and the Interfaith Youth Circle to promote conversations among various faith groups, he said.

During the event yesterday, the PPIS also celebrated its other milestones and achievements in promoting social and family bonds here.

DANGEROUS TEACHINGS

We need to recognise the danger of exclusivist teachings to our social cohesion, and the threat that violent extremist ideology poses to our peace and security. And so, we must reject exclusivist and extremist teachings and not let them take root here in multicultural, multi-religious Singapore.

DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER TEO CHEE HEAN, on the need to prevent young people here from being led astray.

It has, for instance, organised several conferences to promote family ties over the years, and launched new centres with specialised services. These include a centre to provide marital counselling and therapy, and centres for early childhood education.

The association was formed in 1952 to provide support for Muslim women in areas such as employment and childcare.

PPIS president Rahayu Mohamad said the organisation has done well in reaching out to forge new partnerships with other agencies and organisations, as part of its collaborative effort in helping and strengthening the community.

But she added that the work must continue, saying: "Amid celebrating our many achievements and new friendships, we must also remind ourselves to display humility and grace as we journey in the pursuit of excellence."

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 25, 2017, with the headline 'Build trust between communities: DPM'. Print Edition | Subscribe