My Turf

A quiet place for the dead and living

The prayer hall, or mido, situated in the heart of the cemetery park, is meant for Japanese visitors who want to pay their respects and pray. The Japanese Association holds a memorial service in the park each year. The cemetery park, with its pink bo
Nestled within a quaint Yio Chu Kang estate, the Japanese Cemetery Park in Chuan Hoe Avenue is said to be the largest Japanese cemetery outside Japan. The estimated 3ha cemetery - about the size of four football fields - has served as a memorial park since 1973, when the Government passed a law prohibiting further burials at 42 cemeteries.ST PHOTOS: SEAH KWANG PENG
Mr Ng Hua Seng, 63, a retiree who lives near the Japanese Cemetery Park, has been visiting the place for over a decade. He said: "It is very quiet here... People don't disturb you. Plus, it is convenient for me."
Mr Ng Hua Seng, 63, a retiree who lives near the Japanese Cemetery Park, has been visiting the place for over a decade. He said: "It is very quiet here... People don't disturb you. Plus, it is convenient for me."
The prayer hall, or mido, situated in the heart of the cemetery park, is meant for Japanese visitors who want to pay their respects and pray. The Japanese Association holds a memorial service in the park each year. The cemetery park, with its pink bo
The prayer hall, or mido, situated in the heart of the cemetery park, is meant for Japanese visitors who want to pay their respects and pray. The Japanese Association holds a memorial service in the park each year.ST PHOTOS: SEAH KWANG PENG
The prayer hall, or mido, situated in the heart of the cemetery park, is meant for Japanese visitors who want to pay their respects and pray. The Japanese Association holds a memorial service in the park each year. The cemetery park, with its pink bo
The cemetery park, with its pink bougainvilleas and eclectic tomb styles, is a picture of serene elegance. Many visitors go there to enjoy the peace - unfazed by the graves that surround them. ST PHOTOS: SEAH KWANG PENG

My Turf is a fortnightly series that aims to share untold stories of our neighbourhoods. In this instalment, we take a look at the little-known Japanese Cemetery Park in Chuan Hoe Avenue.

A World War II commander, a Japanese prostitute from the early 20th century and one of Sun Yat Sen's personal physicians have one thing in common.

All three have their final resting places here in Singapore at the Japanese Cemetery Park in Chuan Hoe Avenue.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on May 09, 2018, with the headline 'MyTurf A quiet place for the dead and living'. Print Edition | Subscribe