46 turtles hatch at Southern Islands after surviving monitor lizard attack

The turtle eggs were discovered 54 days ago on Sept 8, when a volunteer noticed a monitor lizard eating them.
The turtle eggs were discovered 54 days ago on Sept 8, when a volunteer noticed a monitor lizard eating them.PHOTO: FACEBOOK/NPARKS
The turtle eggs were discovered 54 days ago on Sept 8, when a volunteer noticed a monitor lizard eating them.
The turtle eggs were discovered 54 days ago on Sept 8, when a volunteer noticed a monitor lizard eating them.PHOTO: FACEBOOK/NPARKS

SINGAPORE - A batch of 46 turtle hatchlings emerged at one of the Southern Islands on Wednesday (Nov 1), the National Parks Board (NParks) said in a Facebook post on Thursday morning.

Choosing to not name the island, the agency said the turtle eggs were discovered 54 days ago on Sept 8, when a volunteer noticed a monitor lizard eating them.

The nest was then safeguarded with help from the Singapore Land Authority (SLA), until the eggs were ready to hatch.

When they hatched, the NParks team recorded the baby turtles' vital statistics, before releasing them at "a suitable location", with the help of SLA, the Turtle Working Group, and the Tropical Marine Science Institute.

"We wish these hatchlings all the best and hope to see them back on our shores again someday," NParks wrote.

According to the NParks website, anyone who encounters a nesting turtle should call the agency at 1800-4717300, and keep a distance from the turtle and eggs.

Touching the turtle may scare it, while touching the eggs may damage them or contaminate the nest.

Light and noise may scare the turtle and chase it away without it laying its eggs.

"Keep clear of tracks left by the turtle. Researchers use the tracks to identify the species of the turtle and to locate the nest," NParks wrote.