Parliament: Causeway jams have not caused major disruption to businesses recently

Traffic jams at the Causeway often peaked during festive periods, with some commuters reporting in December 2018 that they were stuck in jams lasting four to six hours at both Tuas and Woodlands Checkpoints.
Traffic jams at the Causeway often peaked during festive periods, with some commuters reporting in December 2018 that they were stuck in jams lasting four to six hours at both Tuas and Woodlands Checkpoints.ST PHOTO: KHALID BABA

SINGAPORE - While traffic snarls at the Causeway may affect deliveries, the Government has not received feedback that the jams are a major source of disruption for local companies recently, said Trade and Industry Minister Chan Chun Sing.

If there are significant disruptions to supply chains by land, businesses will use alternative routes by sea or air freight, reserve stocks for essential supplies, or do both, he added.

Mr Chan was responding in Parliament on Tuesday (Jan 15) to a question from Non-Constituency MP Leon Perera, who had asked about the impact of Causeway jams and what the Government will do to reduce their extent and impact.

Traffic jams at the Causeway often peaked during festive periods, with some commuters reporting last month that they were stuck in jams lasting four to six hours at both Tuas and Woodlands Checkpoints. Home Affairs Minister K. Shanmugam subsequently said immigration officers were doing their best to cope with the increased travel volumes amid a manpower shortage.

Mr Chan noted that many companies schedule deliveries to avoid peak periods, or factor in additional travel time to buffer for delays.

He said the security and sustainability of supply chains are "integral considerations" for businesses, who work with economic agencies to diversify where needed and possible, as well as put in place measures to mitigate possible disruptions.

"We will continue to monitor the situation closely and work with our businesses to diversify and put in place anticipatory measures to ensure the security and sustainability of our supply chains, such that no one factor - be it natural disasters, seasonality or externally imposed actions - can cause a major disruption to our economy," Mr Chan said.