Parliament: More than 600 caught for illegally riding PMDs on the roads in 2018

Of the 616 PMD users caught, 18 per cent - or about 110 cases - were caught on minor roads in private landed estates, said Senior Minister of State for Transport Lam Pin Min in Parliament on Feb 12, 2019.
Of the 616 PMD users caught, 18 per cent - or about 110 cases - were caught on minor roads in private landed estates, said Senior Minister of State for Transport Lam Pin Min in Parliament on Feb 12, 2019.ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG

SINGAPORE - An average of 51 people a month were caught for illegally riding personal mobility devices (PMDs) on the roads last year, up from an average of 40 for the first 11 months of 2017.

Of the 616 PMD users caught last year, 18 per cent - or about 110 cases - were caught on minor roads in private landed estates, said Senior Minister of State for Transport Lam Pin Min in Parliament on Tuesday (Feb 12) in his reply to Workers' Party Non-Constituency MP Dennis Tan.

Riding PMDs on the road is an offence, with first-time offenders facing a fine of $300 for riding on minor roads and $500 for riding on major roads.

Dr Lam said the Land Transport Authority (LTA) focuses enforcement efforts on roads with heavy traffic, as well as areas with significant public feedback.

Separately, Dr Lam said that in cases where pedestrians are hit by PMD riders, both parties can go for mediation at the Singapore Mediation Centre or the Law Society of Singapore.

However, neither organisation has received any mediation cases involving PMD accidents, he said in reply to Ms Lee Bee Wah (Nee Soon GRC).

"If mediation fails, either because one party refuses to attend or the parties are unable to come to a resolution, the claimant can choose to file a civil suit in the State Courts," said Dr Lam, adding that those who cannot afford legal representation can approach the Law Society or the Legal Aid Bureau.

 
 
 

Ms Lee also asked if PMD riders should be made to buy insurance.

Dr Lam replied that while both the LTA and the Active Mobility Advisory Panel encourage riders to buy third-party liability insurance, this was not made mandatory as the panel - which recommends guidelines on the safe use of bicycles and PMDs on public paths - felt it would be onerous on occasional users.

Rather, measures such as reducing the speed limit on footpaths to 10kmh were suggested and later implemented, he added.