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Work-life balance: Every worker's right or a reward after decades of service?

The fuss over quiet quitting puts the spotlight on how different generations view work ethics. Gen Z is forcing a rethink of an overwork culture.

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The first time I heard about the younger generation's work ethic was over 15 years ago, when a colleague said she had just finished interviewing wannabe reporters whose first questions were all about work-life balance.

As a group of mostly Gen X journalists talked about this round the table, we shook our heads at the soft generation. "Did you tell them work-life balance is what you get after serving your dues for 20 years," I asked snarkily.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 23, 2022, with the headline Work-life balance: Every worker's right or a reward after decades of service?. Subscribe