Why some women join ISIS

A picture posted on Twitter by a social media account affiliated with the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria purportedly shows members of an armed, all-female militia. Despite their dreams, women who choose to join ISIS in the battlefield will be treate
A picture posted on Twitter by a social media account affiliated with the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria purportedly shows members of an armed, all-female militia. Despite their dreams, women who choose to join ISIS in the battlefield will be treated as second-class citizens, to say the least, given the distance between what they desire and what they experience.

The Singapore Government recently detained three people, including one woman, for wanting to join ISIS. In these two articles, the first writer explains why some women join the terror group, while the other argues that those who join ISIS should be treated as would-be terrorists, not victims.

Out of three Singaporeans detained for wanting to join the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS) by Singapore's Internal Security Department, one was a woman.

Women, including from South-east Asia, are increasingly joining ISIS. Last month, European police agency Europol reported that women are now playing a greater role in ISIS, "both in front-line fighting and terrorist activities in the West", with at least 123 women terrorists as recently as 2017.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on July 07, 2019, with the headline 'Why some women join ISIS'. Print Edition | Subscribe