What can Indonesia do in its stand-off with China over the Natunas?

As Beijing insists on its 'nine-dash line' map and traditional fishing rights, Jakarta needs new ways to assert its territorial claims

Over the past three weeks, discord between Indonesia and China over illegal fishing in the South China Sea has intensified significantly. The current spat does not bode well for an easing of tensions in the contested waters into the 2020s.

Last month, dozens of Chinese fishing boats entered Indonesia's exclusive economic zone (EEZ) off the Natuna Islands in Riau province.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on January 10, 2020, with the headline 'What can Indonesia do in its stand-off with China over the Natunas?'. Subscribe