This is what debating inequality looks like

The ongoing debate on inequality lacks structure and clarity. To provide focus to the discussion, it is useful to note the key areas of disagreement and understand the end point.

A discussion on inequality last year followed an Institute of Policy Studies survey on class divides galvanised by statistics and stories on social divides.
A discussion on inequality last year followed an Institute of Policy Studies survey on class divides galvanised by statistics and stories on social divides. PHOTO: ST FILE PHOTO
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Galvanised by statistics and stories on social divides in Singapore, the nation began its discussion on inequality last year following a ground-breaking Institute of Policy Studies survey on class divides.

Top government leaders put inequality on the national agenda. Sociologist Teo You Yenn's book This Is What Inequality Looks Like sought to challenge assumptions about poverty. Many commentators in mainstream and social media chimed in.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on July 28, 2018, with the headline This is what debating inequality looks like. Subscribe