The extremist danger if no justice is done for the Rohingya

A Rohingya protest in the Kutupalong refugee camp to mark the one-year anniversary of their exodus to Bangladesh last Saturday. There has been an uptick in "chatter" promoting the crisis as a powerful motivation for militant action.
A Rohingya protest in the Kutupalong refugee camp to mark the one-year anniversary of their exodus to Bangladesh last Saturday. There has been an uptick in "chatter" promoting the crisis as a powerful motivation for militant action.PHOTO: REUTERS

A year after 700,000 Rohingya fled their homeland in Myanmar amid a state-sponsored campaign of mass killings, rape and deportation, much has been said and spoken, but little has been done to hold those responsible to account.

The United Nations fact-finding mission's report this week that concluded that top Myanmar generals must face accountability for genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes was vehement in its assessment of the crimes committed. The next steps are not so clear and any push to indict those responsible is likely to be challenged by Myanmar's neighbours for reasons of "stability".

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 31, 2018, with the headline 'The extremist danger if no justice is done for the Rohingya'. Subscribe