Thailand faces political deadlock after historic polls

Senators' PM vote the key as party rivalries mean forming a coalition will be difficult

Election posters put up along the streets of Nakhon Si Thammarat, southern Thailand, ahead of the polls this Sunday. The general election is set to see an exceptionally high voter turnout, higher than the 75 per cent in the 2011 general election, bec
Election posters put up along the streets of Nakhon Si Thammarat, southern Thailand, ahead of the polls this Sunday. The general election is set to see an exceptionally high voter turnout, higher than the 75 per cent in the 2011 general election, because of the tight race. About 7.34 million young Thais aged 18 to 25 will cast their ballots for the first time, out of 51.4 million voters. ST PHOTO: KUA CHEE SIONG
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Thailand is heading towards a dreadful political deadlock, with the general election this Sunday looking certain to produce an inconclusive outcome.

None of the top three parties is strong enough to win a majority of seats in the 500-member House of Representatives. Yet none wants to join a coalition government led by either of its two rivals, and play second fiddle, because the premiership is at stake.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 21, 2019, with the headline Thailand faces political deadlock after historic polls. Subscribe