Indonesian village projects offer hope in climate fight

Two forest projects in Borneo show the value of a United Nations-backed scheme that protects forests and wildlife, reduces carbon emissions and benefits local communities. This is the second of a two-parter on the carbon credit market.

Rimba Raya has launched a floating health clinic that travels along the Seruyan river in Indonesia's Central Kalimantan province. Rimba Raya and Katingan Mentaya use carbon credit sales to support over 40 villages. The projects have developed a wide
Rimba Raya has launched a floating health clinic that travels along the Seruyan river in Indonesia's Central Kalimantan province. Rimba Raya and Katingan Mentaya use carbon credit sales to support over 40 villages. The projects have developed a wide variety of livelihood and health programmes. PHOTO: RIMBA RAYA BIODIVERSITY RESERVE

In the centre of Borneo island are two projects that protect patches of peat swamp forest three times the size of Singapore.

Once threatened with destruction by palm oil and mining firms, these two privately run businesses were early movers in a United Nations-backed scheme called REDD+ that rewards investors who protect nature and fight climate change.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on April 24, 2021, with the headline 'Indonesian village projects offer hope in climate fight'. Subscribe