How heatwaves became climate change's silent killer

More than floods or droughts, soaring temperatures chart the impact of humans on the environment

A man entering the Hillcrest Community Centre in Vancouver, British Columbia, to cool off during the extreme hot weather in the Canadian province last week. The writer says that what is striking about the news coverage of the most recent heatwave in North America is a general hesitancy to link it to climate change. PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
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(FINANCIAL TIMES) - It is hardly news any more that heat records are being broken every summer. We knew this would happen in a warming world - and so it has.

What is striking about the news coverage of the heatwave that has recently scorched parts of North America is a general hesitancy to link it to climate change. This is particularly galling when science has shown that every heatwave we experience is now made more intense by human-induced global warming. Every single one. Including last week's.

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