On Facebook

Do you agree that the success of tray-return enforcement shows that only laws can change behaviour in Singapore?

Fining is probably the fastest way to change behaviour. But we have to remember that cultural habits do not change overnight. It may take several generations to change the way we behave.
Johnson Ng

What is so unusual about this? Do you think that if you have no laws to mandate mask-wearing, you can get most to wear one just by running an educational campaign?
Toh Hai Hoe Damien

There is always room for improvement in this aspect. If I remember correctly, as a student, I was taught to return the cups, bowls and plates after I had eaten my meals. It's a good practice to continue in the many years ahead. In addition, we have to strengthen the infrastructure in hawker centres and coffee shops to facilitate this initiative.
Francis Ng

Yes, only the threat of a fine can make people obey rules and regulations. Take, for example, public transport, where even with staff walking through the train cabin holding a placard that says "please refrain from talking", nobody cares. Many commuters, especially students, continue to yak loudly to their friends or on their phones.
May Ong

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 14, 2021, with the headline 'On Facebook'. Subscribe