Letter of the week: Employers must help maids with tasks

A domestic helper pushing an elderly woman on the wheelchair on Oct 25, 2019.
A domestic helper pushing an elderly woman on the wheelchair on Oct 25, 2019.PHOTO: ST FILE

I agree that it is not fair to expect a maid to be both housekeeper and caregiver (Maids canNov 14).

Caregiving in itself is a very intensive job, physically, mentally and emotionally. To expect a maid to do this and also housekeep is unacceptable.

When my maid was employed to care for my elderly mother who suffered a stroke, I told my maid that she need not do housework if she was busy caring for my mother.

I always remind her that taking care of my mother is the priority and cleaning the house can be done when she has time, like when my mother is napping.

When I return from work, I take over caring for my mother to give my maid a break and I do the housework that she was not able to complete.

An employer must help the maid as it's simply not possible for her to do both housework and be a caregiver. This will help keep the maid from getting stressed and experiencing burnout, or falling sick due to exhaustion. When the maid is tired, she cannot care well for the elderly person.

The problem is that many employers expect the maid to do everything just because they are paying her a salary.

Susan Tan Lin Neo