ScienceTalk

Electronic skins - fiction or reality?

Assistant Professor Benjamin Tee from the National University of Singapore has won awards for his research on “electronic skin” for use in robotics and prosthetic devices.
Assistant Professor Benjamin Tee from the National University of Singapore has won awards for his research on “electronic skin” for use in robotics and prosthetic devices. PHOTO: NUS

Advanced stretchable electronics open doors to skin-like devices that could potentially personalise beauty regimes, track health indicators and make robotics smarter.

Skin is our interface to the physical world. It not only protects us from harmful environmental effects, but also provides the touch sensations needed for our daily activities.

In addition to touch, our skin senses temperature, humidity and even gentle breezes, giving us a rich experience of the physical world.

Please or to continue reading the full article. Learn more about ST PREMIUM.

Enjoy unlimited access to ST's best work

  • Exclusive stories and features on multiple devices
  • In-depth analyses and opinion pieces
  • ePaper and award-winning multimedia content
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on April 20, 2019, with the headline 'Electronic skins - fiction or reality?'. Print Edition | Subscribe