Eco nightmare of today's throwaway fashion

This is the last of 12 primers on current affairs issues that are part of the outreach programme for The Straits Times-Ministry of Education National Current Affairs Quiz

A booth at an NUS Save event with a poster about the textiles recycling programme. An online survey of 4,097 Singapore respondents by research agency YouGov in 2017 found that 73 per cent had thrown away clothes in the past year while 34 per cent had
A booth at an NUS Save event with a poster about the textiles recycling programme. An online survey of 4,097 Singapore respondents by research agency YouGov in 2017 found that 73 per cent had thrown away clothes in the past year while 34 per cent had discarded an item after wearing it only once. PHOTO: NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF SINGAPORE (NUS) STUDENTS AGAINST VIOLATION OF THE EARTH (SAVE)

The Japanese company that owns Uniqlo and other clothing brands gave a media preview last month of a new technology to reduce the amount of water used to give jeans a "worn in" look.

It is among greener moves by fashion businesses in an industry increasingly scrutinised for its environmental impact - from the consumption of resources, pollution arising from the production process and beyond, to the creation of clothing waste.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on August 05, 2019, with the headline 'Eco nightmare of today's throwaway fashion'. Subscribe