When a loved one thinks an impostor has replaced you

Dr Carol Berman and her husband, Marty, in 2006. Mr Berman began to show signs of dementia when he turned 74, and later developed Capgras syndrome. Though much is unknown about why this condition occurs, researchers have said answers lie in how the c
Dr Carol Berman and her husband, Marty, in 2006. Mr Berman began to show signs of dementia when he turned 74, and later developed Capgras syndrome. Though much is unknown about why this condition occurs, researchers have said answers lie in how the complex brain system works.PHOTO: FAMILY PHOTO

Capgras syndrome led lawyer to believe wife was a stranger pretending to be her

On a beautiful autumn afternoon in New York's Central Park, Dr Carol Berman had the horrifying realisation that her husband of 40 years no longer recognised her as his wife.

In his eyes, she was not the real Carol but rather some strange woman pretending to be Carol - an impostor.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on April 17, 2018, with the headline 'When a loved one thinks an impostor has replaced you'. Print Edition | Subscribe