Coronavirus Pandemic

Bleak in Venice

Venetians, whose city relies heavily on tourism, are anxious about the prolonged effects of the outbreak

The empty Constitution Bridge on the Grand Canal in Venice last Sunday as Italy imposed a lockdown in the country to slow the spread of the coronavirus.
The empty Constitution Bridge on the Grand Canal in Venice last Sunday as Italy imposed a lockdown in the country to slow the spread of the coronavirus. PHOTOS: BLOOMBERG, REUTERS
Restaurants and tourist attractions have been similarly hit, with empty tables in Piazza San Marco (above) and an almost deserted St Mark’s Square.
Restaurants and tourist attractions have been similarly hit, with empty tables in Piazza San Marco (above) and an almost deserted St Mark’s Square.PHOTOS: BLOOMBERG, REUTERS
Restaurants and tourist attractions have been similarly hit, with empty tables in Piazza San Marco and an almost deserted St Mark’s Square (above).
Restaurants and tourist attractions have been similarly hit, with empty tables in Piazza San Marco and an almost deserted St Mark’s Square (above).PHOTOS: BLOOMBERG, REUTERS

Few destinations in the world are as closely tied to tourism as Venice.

Last year, the city ramped up measures to deal with the impact of over-tourism, until the unprecedented acqua alta flooding in November brought the Unesco-listed city to its knees.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on March 22, 2020, with the headline 'Bleak in Venice'. Subscribe