The Chic Home: When old meets new

The mezzanine space (right) is where the home owner indulges her passion for painting. The home is kept bright and breezy, thanks to cooling strategies such as cross ventilation (left). The master bathroom (above) is naturally illuminated in the day,
The home is kept bright and breezy, thanks to cooling strategies such as cross ventilation (above).PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES, STUDIO WILLS + ARCHITECTS, KHOO GUO JIE; ART DIRECTION: NONIE CHEN
The mezzanine space (right) is where the home owner indulges her passion for painting. The home is kept bright and breezy, thanks to cooling strategies such as cross ventilation (left). The master bathroom (above) is naturally illuminated in the day,
The master bathroom (above) is naturally illuminated in the day, thanks to the adjacent airwell.PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES, STUDIO WILLS + ARCHITECTS, KHOO GUO JIE; ART DIRECTION: NONIE CHEN
(Above) Mustard hues contrast against white to create a distinction between the newly built extensions and original architecture of the house.
(Above) Mustard hues contrast against white to create a distinction between the newly built extensions and original architecture of the house.PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES, STUDIO WILLS + ARCHITECTS, KHOO GUO JIE; ART DIRECTION: NONIE CHEN
The mezzanine space (above) is where the home owner indulges her passion for painting.
The mezzanine space (above) is where the home owner indulges her passion for painting.PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES, STUDIO WILLS + ARCHITECTS, KHOO GUO JIE; ART DIRECTION: NONIE CHEN
The mezzanine space (right) is where the home owner indulges her passion for painting. The home is kept bright and breezy, thanks to cooling strategies such as cross ventilation (left). The master bathroom (above) is naturally illuminated in the day,
Plenty of greenery fills the master bathroom, creating a relaxing ambience.PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES, STUDIO WILLS + ARCHITECTS, KHOO GUO JIE; ART DIRECTION: NONIE CHEN

The owners of this 30-year-old terrace house decided not to tear it down, but did addition-and-alteration works to it instead

When Mr James Tan and his wife, in their 40s, bought this two-storey corner terrace house in Telok Kurau, they decided not to tear down the structure. Instead, they chose to preserve the 30-year-old building and do addition-and-alteration works to enhance its architecture and functionality.

The couple's brief to architects William Ng and Kho Keguang of Studio Wills + Architectswas to have a three-bedroom house with a sheltered car porch, a pared-down facade as well as an additional level for a subtly unusual element.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 06, 2018, with the headline 'When old meets new'. Print Edition | Subscribe