Tearing down walls at biennale

This chapel designed by British architect Norman Foster is part of the Vatican pavilion. A bamboo installation (above) at Building A Future Countryside, China's pavilion. Titled In Statu Quo, the Israeli installation (left) examines the negotiation o
This chapel designed by British architect Norman Foster is part of the Vatican pavilion.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
A bamboo installation (above) at Building A Future Countryside, China’s pavilion.
A bamboo installation (above) at Building A Future Countryside, China’s pavilion.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE
This chapel designed by British architect Norman Foster is part of the Vatican pavilion. A bamboo installation (above) at Building A Future Countryside, China's pavilion. Titled In Statu Quo, the Israeli installation (left) examines the negotiation o
Titled In Statu Quo, the Israeli installation (above) examines the negotiation of sacred spaces.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

The International Architecture Exhibition, which is part of the Venice Biennale, aims to champion a 'sense of humanity'

VENICE • The writing is on the wall, say observers, worried about a growing global move to be non-inclusive, with many countries putting up border walls and barbed wire fences.

In a bid to wall off such trends, the International Architecture Exhibition, which started last week in Venice, is championing a "sense of humanity" instead.

Please or to continue reading the full article. Learn more about ST PREMIUM.

Enjoy unlimited access to ST's best work

  • Exclusive stories and features on multiple devices
  • In-depth analyses and opinion pieces
  • ePaper and award-winning multimedia content
A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 02, 2018, with the headline 'Tearing down walls at biennale'. Print Edition | Subscribe