Screed king: Raw, textured looks to keep with industrial theme

(Right) In the living room, the ceiling has been ripped apart to showcase the pipes and air-conditioning ducts for an industrial-chic feel. (Above) A sleek cabinet with concealed lighting near the apartment's entrance serves as a display for the owne
(Above) In the living room, the ceiling has been ripped apart to showcase the pipes and air-conditioning ducts for an industrial-chic feel. PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES; ART DIRECTION: NONIE CHEN
(Above) A sleek cabinet with concealed lighting near the apartment's entrance serves as a display for the owner's shoe collection.
(Above) A sleek cabinet with concealed lighting near the apartment's entrance serves as a display for the owner's shoe collection. PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES; ART DIRECTION: NONIE CHEN
(Right) In the living room, the ceiling has been ripped apart to showcase the pipes and air-conditioning ducts for an industrial-chic feel. (Above) A sleek cabinet with concealed lighting near the apartment's entrance serves as a display for the owne
(Above) A custom-designed headboard adds a cosy vibe to the master bedroom.PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES; ART DIRECTION: NONIE CHEN

Grey areas dominate in this apartment, which has complementary accessories in the same hue

It took a good amount of effort to cement the look.

About six layers of cement screed had to be painstakingly applied (at intervals) before the walls had the effect the owner wanted - a raw textured look befitting the industrial theme of this home, which took three months to renovate at a cost of about $70,000.

"It took the longest time to finish. I'm not sure if I want to go through another round of this," says Mr Jimmy Tay, design director of design firm Jimmy Tay Studio, jokingly.

He adds: "The owner wanted a strong industrial look throughout, so the cement walls pervade the entire home with no 'break' in the grey palette."

The grey walls also serve as an edgy backdrop for the owner's collection of pop artworks in the two-bedroom condominium at The Inspira near River Valley. The owner, an investment manager in his 30s, moved in two years ago.

And what is an industrial theme without "full exposure"?

The living room's ceiling was ripped apart to show the pipes and air-conditioning ducts. Even the water tank in the kitchen was left exposed and given a bold coat of black.

"Since the owner lives alone, there were no reservations about going full-on with the masculine look," says Mr Tay.

Light switches are in dark grey to go with the theme and solid timber window blinds were chosen over conventional blinds for a warm touch.

The original floor tiles in the living room are overlaid with vinyl, allowing for better flooring protection and adding to the warm "earthy" touches of the 936 sq ft home.

Next to the entrance is a bespoke shoe cabinet to house the owner's sizeable collection of footwear.

The last thing the owner wanted was the usual TV console and feature wall. So Mr Tay worked with him to design a TV ledge made from a huge plank of solid wood specially imported from Indonesia and mounted it on slabs of grey bricks.

The original wall separating the kitchen from the living room was removed to create a seamless singular space. As the owner does not cook or have dinners often at home, the quartz countertop in metallic grey in the open-concept kitchen was customised to protrude and serve as a dining space where he can sit on the high chair and have breakfast or a nightcap.

Mounted on various sections of the walls in the living room and master bedroom are slim, sleek shelves bought online to serve as display niches for knick-knacks.

The industrial theme also makes its presence felt in the spacious master bedroom. The original flooring was stained a darker shade for a more masculine feel. This also helps to make the room a more restful sanctuary.

•This article first appeared in the August 2019 issue of Home & Decor, which is published by SPH Magazines.

•Get the November and latest issue of Home & Decor (above) now at all newsstands or download the digital edition of Home & Decor from the App Store, Magzter or Google Play. Also, see more inspiring homes at www.homeanddecor.com.sg

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 26, 2019, with the headline 'Screed king'. Print Edition | Subscribe