Small size, big experience

Founders of small restaurants say these give them the flexibility to experiment as well as provide personalised dining

At pizza omakase joint Small’s (above), a four-seat eatery, chef Bjorn Shen serves modern takes on dishes like Neapolitan-style pizzas and hot wings.
At pizza omakase joint Small’s (above), a four-seat eatery, chef Bjorn Shen serves modern takes on dishes like Neapolitan-style pizzas and hot wings. PHOTO: SMALL’S
Wine bar Crush, founded by sommelier Shamini Krishnan (above), had only six seats and offered wines as flights as well as hard-to-procure wines by the glass.
Wine bar Crush, founded by sommelier Shamini Krishnan (above), had only six seats and offered wines as flights as well as hard-to-procure wines by the glass. PHOTO: COURTESY OF SHAMINI KRISHNAN
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Smaller-format restaurants that give chefs the flexibility to experiment outside their usual scope and have closer interactions with diners are shaking up the food scene in a big way.

There are just four seats at pizza omakase joint Small's by chef Bjorn Shen, 38; eight at high-end sushi bar Oshino by award-winning chef Koichiro Oshino, 50; and 12 at the as-yet-unnamed Japanese-French dining spot by restaurateur Tan Ken Loon, 44.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Sunday Times on February 02, 2020, with the headline Small size, big experience. Subscribe