Disgusting Food Museum

Exhibits at the Disgusting Food Museum include (clockwise from far left) mouse wine from China; fried tarantula from Cambodia; maggot-infested pecorino (cheese) from Sardinia; and Balut or balot, a boiled duck embryo from the Philippines.
Exhibits at the Disgusting Food Museum include mouse wine from China (above); fried tarantula from Cambodia; maggot-infested pecorino (cheese) from Sardinia; and Balut or balot, a boiled duck embryo from the Philippines.PHOTOS: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE, REUTERS
Exhibits at the Disgusting Food Museum include (clockwise from far left) mouse wine from China; fried tarantula from Cambodia; maggot-infested pecorino (cheese) from Sardinia; and Balut or balot, a boiled duck embryo from the Philippines.
Exhibits at the Disgusting Food Museum include mouse wine from China; fried tarantula from Cambodia (above); maggot-infested pecorino (cheese) from Sardinia; and Balut or balot, a boiled duck embryo from the Philippines.PHOTOS: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE, REUTERS
Exhibits at the Disgusting Food Museum include (clockwise from far left) mouse wine from China; fried tarantula from Cambodia; maggot-infested pecorino (cheese) from Sardinia; and Balut or balot, a boiled duck embryo from the Philippines.
Exhibits at the Disgusting Food Museum include mouse wine from China; fried tarantula from Cambodia; maggot-infested pecorino (cheese) from Sardinia (above); and Balut or balot, a boiled duck embryo from the Philippines.PHOTOS: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE, REUTERS
Exhibits at the Disgusting Food Museum include (clockwise from far left) mouse wine from China; fried tarantula from Cambodia; maggot-infested pecorino (cheese) from Sardinia; and Balut or balot, a boiled duck embryo from the Philippines.
Exhibits at the Disgusting Food Museum include mouse wine from China; fried tarantula from Cambodia; maggot-infested pecorino (cheese) from Sardinia; and Balut or balot, a boiled duck embryo from the Philippines (above).PHOTOS: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE, REUTERS

Exhibition in Sweden explores why some foods turn people off

MALMO (Sweden) • It is a prickly issue for debate. Is the durian, for example, disgusting?

The idea that anything labelled as food can be described as disgusting is a minefield, running up against cultural tastes, not to mention the shrinking ability of some countries to feed all their people.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 14, 2018, with the headline 'Disgusting Food Museum'. Print Edition | Subscribe