US producer still keen to make Chinese horror films

 Get Out producer Jason Blum has forged a reputation for turning low-budget productions into box-office gold.
Get Out producer Jason Blum has forged a reputation for turning low-budget productions into box-office gold.PHOTO: AFP

BUSAN (South Korea) • Get Out producer Jason Blum is not afraid that his plans to tap the lucrative Chinese movie market will get the boot from the trade war between Beijing and Washington.

"I like challenges," he said, speaking on the sidelines of the 23rd Busan International Film Festival.

The driving force behind global hits such as the Oscar-nominated Whiplash (2014) and horror sensation Get Out (2017), Blum has forged a reputation for turning low-budget productions into box-office gold.

He still has his eyes on a collaboration in China and similar partnerships within other Asian markets.

"I was intrigued by the notion of producing a film that would qualify as a local scary movie, to follow all the rules of the (Chinese) censor and to make it scary," said Blum.

But he looks to have another hit with the sequel to the horror classic Halloween, which is poised for its roll-out into theatres around the world and is making a splash in Busan, Asia's largest film festival.

Halloween is being positioned as a direct sequel to the John Carpenter-directed "slasher" classic that was released in 1978, despite the fact that the franchise has now produced 11 films.

The movie reunites Jamie Lee Curtis and Nick Castle in the lead roles from the original, with pundits saying it could earn up to US$60 million (S$83 million) from its Oct 19 opening weekend in North America.

"We're at the top of a (horror) cycle right now," said Blum.

"And if you make good horror movies, there's always an audience."

AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 09, 2018, with the headline 'US producer still keen to make Chinese horror films'. Print Edition | Subscribe