Step into Stephen King's house of horrors

Stephen King
Stephen King

BOSTON • Fans of horror king Stephen King can now scream - with delight. The American author has decided to convert his Maine home that inspired his work into a museum and writers' retreat.

The blood-red mansion in Bangor is a popular spot for fans who come to take photographs of the property that has a spooky wrought-iron fence featuring spiders and bat-winged creatures.

The authorities have approved a bid by King, 72, to set up a museum that will house his work and provide space, at a house next door, for five writers at a time, reported People magazine.

King wrote in a 1983 essay that the idea for the novel It, which was adapted into a 2017 blockbuster movie, was hatched when he moved into the Bangor house.

Of the Victorian mansion, he wrote: "I think it disapproved of us at first. The parlour seemed cold in a way that had little to do with temperature. The cat would not go into that room; the kids avoided it.

"My oldest son was convinced there were ghosts in the turret towers (that idea was probably more due to the Hardy Boys than to parental influence)."

King and his wife will relocate to another home in Florida.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 19, 2019, with the headline 'Step into Stephen King's house of horrors'. Print Edition | Subscribe