Love & Pride Film Festival: The unseen side of Japan

One of the cases featured in documentary Of Love And Law is that of artist Rokudenashiko (centre, with lawyer Kazu, far right), who was charged under Japan's obscenity laws.
One of the cases featured in documentary Of Love And Law is that of artist Rokudenashiko (centre, with lawyer Kazu, right), who was charged under Japan's obscenity laws.PHOTO: GOLDEN VILLAGE
One of the cases featured in documentary Of Love And Law is that of artist Rokudenashiko (centre, with lawyer Kazu, far right), who was charged under Japan's obscenity laws.
Hikaru Toda

The opening film of Golden Village's Love & Pride Film Festival is a documentary about two men who are partners in the country's only LGBTQ law firm

The movies in the 10th edition of Golden Village's Love & Pride Film Festival centre around the notion of acceptance and not just of the LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) community.

In the opening film today, documentary Of Love And Law (2017), director Hikaru Toda follows two Japanese men, Fumi and Kazu, who are lovers as well as partners in the country's only LGBTQ law firm. They take up cases on behalf of those in the minority and which sometimes challenge the status quo, including defending the artist Rokudenashiko against charges of obscenity for her work featuring female genitalia.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on October 04, 2018, with the headline 'The unseen side of Japan'. Print Edition | Subscribe