King Arthur has a chance to weave magic in new movie directed by Guy Ritchie

Charlie Hunnam, who plays the part of  Arthur, at  the world premiere of Arthur: Legend Of The Sword, at the TCL Chinese Theatre on May 8, in Hollywood.
Charlie Hunnam, who plays the part of Arthur, at the world premiere of Arthur: Legend Of The Sword, at the TCL Chinese Theatre on May 8, in Hollywood. PHOTO: AFP

NEW YORK (Reuters) - A new dawn and possibly even a franchise await the legend of British folklore hero King Arthur.

Warner Bros' King Arthur: Legend Of The Sword, out in US theatres on Friday, revives the tales of the legendary warrior, his famed knights of the round table and the magician Merlin.

Directed by Guy Ritchie, it goes back to the origins of Arthur, played by Charlie Hunnam, as he is plucked from the poverty in which he grew up as an orphan, and becomes a reluctant leader of a resistance against his uncle, King Vortigern, played by Jude Law.

"Something that has been really, really important in my life, and it's one of the central themes of the film, is a person's unquestionable ability to elevate themselves in life through conscious endeavour," Hunnam told Reuters.

While the folklore of King Arthur dates back to the Middle Ages, the story of a civilian uprising is something that can apply to a modern-day audience, said Djimon Hounsou who plays Arthur's confidant Bedivere.

The legend of King Arthur has been adapted into numerous films over the years.

Ritchie believes it has staying power, saying he has already envisioned several more films for his iteration of the hero.