James Bond and the drama of movie-making

Actor Daniel Craig (above, in Spectre, 2015) will reprise his role as 007 in the new film, while Cary Fukunaga (left), the franchise's first non-British director, will helm it.
Actor Daniel Craig (above, in Spectre, 2015) will reprise his role as 007 in the new film, while Cary Fukunaga, the franchise's first non-British director, will helm it.PHOTO: SONY PICTURES, EPA-EFE
Actor Daniel Craig (above, in Spectre, 2015) will reprise his role as 007 in the new film, while Cary Fukunaga (left), the franchise's first non-British director, will helm it.
Actor Daniel Craig will reprise his role as 007 in the new film, while Cary Fukunaga (above), the franchise's first non-British director, will helm it.PHOTO: SONY PICTURES, EPA-EFE

The troubled production of the latest instalment of the spy franchise is a symptom of how the movie industry operates today

WASHINGTON • Being a moviegoer used to be easy.

You would see a trailer for the new Star Wars or James Bond flick, get excited, maybe read a review or an interview with the director in your local newspaper and then you would go see the movie. End of transaction.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on September 22, 2018, with the headline 'James Bond and the drama of movie-making'. Print Edition | Subscribe