Director Darren Aronofsky takes on nature with TV documentary One Strange Rock

(Clockwise from top) Crew filming on the glaciers of Svalbard; Africa and the Indian Ocean as seen from the International Space Station; and a bend in a river as seen from space.
Crew filming on the glaciers of Svalbard (above); Africa and the Indian Ocean as seen from the International Space Station; and a bend in a river as seen from space.PHOTOS: NASA, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
(Clockwise from top) Crew filming on the glaciers of Svalbard; Africa and the Indian Ocean as seen from the International Space Station; and a bend in a river as seen from space.
Crew filming on the glaciers of Svalbard; Africa and the Indian Ocean as seen from the International Space Station (above); and a bend in a river as seen from space.PHOTOS: NASA, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
(Clockwise from top) Crew filming on the glaciers of Svalbard; Africa and the Indian Ocean as seen from the International Space Station; and a bend in a river as seen from space.
Crew filming on the glaciers of Svalbard; Africa and the Indian Ocean as seen from the International Space Station; and a bend in a river as seen from space (above).PHOTOS: NASA, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

Film-maker Darren Aronofsky takes on nature documentaries with One Strange Rock, about Earth's uniqueness and fragility

He is best known for directing psychological horror films such as the Oscar-winning Black Swan (2010) and last year's much-discussed Mother! - so Darren Aronofsky's decision to make a nature documentary for television may seem puzzling at first.

But it begins to make sense when you consider that he describes Mother! as a parable about climate change, as told through the story of a married couple whose lives are disrupted by uninvited guests.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 22, 2018, with the headline 'From horror to climate change'. Print Edition | Subscribe