Cowell happy to be cellphone-free

The X Factor judge Simon Cowell has not used his cellphone for 10 months and says the decision has been good for his mental health.
The X Factor judge Simon Cowell has not used his cellphone for 10 months and says the decision has been good for his mental health.PHOTO: AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE

LONDON • The mobile phone has been given the axe by The X Factor judge Simon Cowell.

In fact, he has not used the device for 10 months, tapping the move to answer his own call for better mental health and happiness.

Speaking to Mail On Sunday, he said: "The difference it made was that I became more aware of the people around me and (I was) way more focused.

"The thing I get irritated with is when you have a meeting, everyone's on his phone - and I was probably in that place too. You can't concentrate."

He added that it has been good for his mental health.

"It's a very strange experience, but it really is good for you and it has absolutely made me happier.

"I don't have that worry of 'oh god, I've lost my phone' anymore either. If people want to get hold of me, they will get hold of me."

The 58-year-old is also unplugging his son from modern technology, curbing the time his four-year-old uses his iPad. Instead, father and son watch TV shows together, reported the Guardian.

Cowell is also plugging into a healthier lifestyle in other areas.

After he fell down the stairs of his London home last year, he realised that life could not be taken for granted. He has cut down on liquor and cigarettes.

But he remains a glutton for work.

The BBC and Cowell will soon link up for a new reality television series called The Greatest Dancer, where contestants around the world will vie for the title with nifty footwork.

He is also mulling over whether his hit show The X Factor should be screened on the BBC instead, a move which will hurt current broadcaster ITV.

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on June 06, 2018, with the headline 'Cowell happy to be cellphone-free'. Print Edition | Subscribe