Cantopop legends Sam Hui and Alan Tam promise fans their concert in Singapore will be 'the best of the best'

Sam Hui and Alan Tam will be performing together in Singapore for the first time on Dec 1, 2018.
Sam Hui and Alan Tam will be performing together in Singapore for the first time on Dec 1, 2018.PHOTO: FACEBOOK/ALAN TAM

SINGAPORE - With two of Cantopop's biggest stars singing together at the same show, the upcoming Alan Tam and Sam Hui joint concert should be able to draw in the crowds easily.

Yet, Hui has now thrown in another bone for the taking - his elder comedian brother Michael Hui might appear at the show too.

"Hopefully, he will be here. Things are not certain yet," the 70-year-old says cryptically in Cantonese.

"He really might. He loves coming to Singapore because of the food here. He loves eating the seafood here," Tam, 68, adds.

The two veteran Cantopop singers were speaking to The Straits Times and other media at a press event to promote their upcoming concert at the Singapore Indoor Stadium on Dec 1.

It will be the first time they are performing together here, following a successful run of their joint Happy Together concert series in Hong Kong over the past year.

The Singapore show will be a condensed version of two separate shows. "Think of this one as the best of the best," says Tam.

Besides singing a number of duets, they will also sing on their own, a selection of each other's biggest hits. Do not ask them about the concert set list yet though because they are having a hard time whittling down the final selection.

Tam, who has written more than 800 songs over a five-decade career, says: "Between the two of us, we have way too many songs to choose from. We are like classic song warehouses."

Hui, who is widely considered to be the first-ever major Cantopop star, is nicknamed the "God of songs" and has over 23 albums to his name. Some of his most famous tunes include From The Heart Of A Loafer and Tsim Sha Tsui Susie.

One of Tan's most popular songs is Love In Autumn, a classic romantic ballad that has become a hit tune to play at weddings in Hong Kong.

He says with a laugh: "But I always tell the wedding couples that they really should not play this song at their wedding because the first line goes, 'If in life you are meant to break up'."