Mona Lisa's smile shows she is happy, says study

Mona Lisa is often held up as a symbol of enigma. The portrait appears to many to be smiling sweetly at first, only to take on a mocking sneer or sad stare the longer you look.
Mona Lisa is often held up as a symbol of enigma. The portrait appears to many to be smiling sweetly at first, only to take on a mocking sneer or sad stare the longer you look.PHOTO: AFP

PARIS (AFP) • The subject of centuries of scrutiny and debate, Mona Lisa's smile is routinely described as ambiguous. But is it that hard to read?

Apparently not.

In an unusual trial, close to 100 per cent of people described her expression as unequivocally "happy", researchers revealed last Friday.

"We were astonished," neuro- scientist Juergen Kornmeier of the University of Freiburg in Germany, who co-authored the study, said.

He and a team used what is arguably the most famous artwork in the world in a study of factors that influence how humans judge visual cues such as facial expressions.

Mona Lisa is often held up as a symbol of enigma. The portrait appears to many to be smiling sweetly at first, only to take on a mocking sneer or sad stare the longer you look.

Using a black-and-white copy of the early 16th-century masterpiece by Leonardo da Vinci, a team manipulated the model's mouth corners slightly up and down to create eight altered images - four marginally, but progressively "happier", and four "sadder" Mona Lisas.

A block of nine images were shown to 12 trial participants 30 times.

In every showing, for which the pictures were randomly reshuffled, participants had to describe each of the nine images as happy or sad.

"Given the descriptions from art and art history, we thought that the original would be the most ambiguous," Dr Kornmeier said.

Instead, "to our great astonishment, we found that Da Vinci's original was... perceived as happy" in 97 per cent of cases, he added.

A second phase of the experiment involved the original Mona Lisa with eight "sadder" versions, with even more nuanced differences in the tilt of the lips. In this test, the original was still described as happy, but participants' readings of the other images changed.

"They were perceived a little sadder" than in the first experiment, said Dr Kornmeier.

The findings confirm that "we don't have an absolute fixed scale of happiness and sadness in our brain" - and that a lot depends on context, the researcher explained.

"Our brain manages to very, very quickly scan the field. We notice the total range and then we adapt our estimates" using our memory of previous sensory experiences, he said.

Another interesting discovery was that people were quicker to identify happier Mona Lisas than sad ones. This suggested a slight preference in human beings for happiness, said Dr Kornmeier.

As for the masterpiece itself, the team believes its work has finally settled a centuries-old question.

"There may be some ambiguity in another aspect," said Dr Kornmeier, but "not ambiguity in the sense of happy versus sad".

A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on March 13, 2017, with the headline 'Mona Lisa's smile shows she is happy, says study'. Print Edition | Subscribe