Connecting people through the arts

Visual artist Tan Chwee Seng demonstrating sketch techniques to participants at a sketch walk, Artsy Avenues, in Queenstown. Puppeteer Ellison Tan doing a performance as part of Drama Box's Both Sides Now community engagement programme, which uses ar
Visual artist Tan Chwee Seng demonstrating sketch techniques to participants at a sketch walk, Artsy Avenues, in Queenstown. PHOTO: NATIONAL ARTS COUNCIL
Visual artist Tan Chwee Seng demonstrating sketch techniques to participants at a sketch walk, Artsy Avenues, in Queenstown. Puppeteer Ellison Tan doing a performance as part of Drama Box's Both Sides Now community engagement programme, which uses ar
Puppeteer Ellison Tan doing a performance as part of Drama Box’s Both Sides Now community engagement programme, which uses art practice to explore what people in the heartland think of end-of-life issues. PHOTO: ARTSWOK COLLABORATIVE

Community arts has grown in popularity, shaking off its image as mere handicraft sessions for children or senior folk

Visual artist Michael Lee, 46, admits that he was reluctant to work on community art projects until this year. "Other than the lack of time, I was worried the quality of my work would be compromised when I couldn't control what was made," he says.

But this year, he has worked on two community arts projects: Mapping Our Lives, in which a group of seniors reflected on their life stories using mind-mapping, and How Are Things, an art installation at Woodlands Stadium.

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A version of this article appeared in the print edition of The Straits Times on November 27, 2018, with the headline 'Connecting people through the arts'. Print Edition | Subscribe