The Chic Home: Breathing new life into Everton Park HDB flat

The home is designed around the central structural column as the focus, with different zones for dining, relaxing and storage built around it. PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES; ART DIRECTION: KRISTY QUAH
A shorter feature wall not only hides cables, but also allows air and light to flow in. PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES; ART DIRECTION: KRISTY QUAH
Using stainless steel for the bar lends an edgy feel to the home and makes the area visually distinct from other zones. PHOTOS: SPH MAGAZINES; ART DIRECTION: KRISTY QUAH

SINGAPORE – Everton Park has always held a special place in Ms Jody Ang’s heart.

A full-time baker and confectioner in her early 30s, she cherishes the neighbourhood because it is where she grew up.

So, when she and her husband Cedric Chng – who is also in his early 30s and declines to reveal his occupation – found this resale Housing Board flat in the area, they bought it without hesitation. The 750 sq ft three-room flat is part of a two-storey shopfront unit, with Ms Ang’s bakery downstairs.

The couple chose Ms Rei Ye, senior designer at local firm Arkhilite, to create their desired minimalist-chic look: a fully open space with a low-key neutral palette and hardly any walls.

The living room, dining area, bar and workspace share the same area.

Everything is designed around the structural column in the middle of the flat. The television feature wall is built on one side, with a cast-concrete dining table on the other side to make it look like a natural extension of the column. Behind is a bar – in stainless steel for an edgy look – and a niche for storing liquor.

Using stainless steel for the bar lends an edgy feel to the home and makes the area visually distinct from other zones. PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES; ART DIRECTION: KRISTY QUAH

The flat lacks a household shelter and the bedroom is too small for a wardrobe, but these issues have been resolved with full-height cabinets along one wall that store the couple’s clothes, a hidden workstation and other household bric-a-brac.

The full-height cabinet conceals a work station. PHOTO: SPH MAGAZINES; ART DIRECTION: KRISTY QUAH

The “wall” between the kitchen and bedroom is also a full-height cabinet that stores kitchen goods on one side and personal effects on the other. There is also a fluted glass partition which lets light through.

A sliding screen separates the bedroom from the communal area. When there are visitors, the screen slides over to hide the bedroom. When it is just the home owners, they move the screen to the other side or open up both areas.

Even the front door is free of visual clutter, as there is no gate. There is just a large fluted glass porthole in place of the usual peephole-and-doorbell combination. The home owners feel safe enough to do this as Ms Ang knows the neighbourhood well.

  • This article first appeared in the August 2022 issue of Home & Decor, which is published by SPH Magazines.
  • Get the September and latest issue of Home & Decor now at all newsstands or download the digital edition of Home & Decor from the App Store, Magzter or Google Play. Also, see more inspiring homes at str.sg/wK6Z

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