SAF training - ownership of own safety important

All the safety measures, no matter how robust, will come to nought if individuals do not take ownership of their own safety by observing the safety measures.
All the safety measures, no matter how robust, will come to nought if individuals do not take ownership of their own safety by observing the safety measures. PHOTO: ST FILE

Lieutenant-Colonel (NS) Jonathan Mark Jeremiah is spot on with his observations (National servicemen must do their part to uphold safety, May 10).

All the safety measures, no matter how robust, will come to nought if individuals do not take ownership of their own safety by observing the safety measures.

Inculcating a safety mindset in all Singapore Armed Forces (SAF) soldiers - from commanders to troopers - to take ownership of their own safety by observing all safety measures should be of utmost priority.

Commanders especially need to lead by example in this regard, and not turn a blind eye when safety measures are not complied with.

The most sensible piece of advice I got during my National Service days during which I held a combat vocation came from the physical training instructor, of all people.

He said that I had to take ownership of my own safety and take care of myself, because no one else will.

At the end of the day, after every SAF training exercise, every soldier owes it to himself to return to unit safely and, more importantly, to return to their families and loved ones safely.

Woon Wee Min