Question anything that is 'too good to be true'

Between September and November 2018, the police received reports from people who have lost some $78,000 in total to misleading online articles.
Between September and November 2018, the police received reports from people who have lost some $78,000 in total to misleading online articles.PHOTO: THE NEW PAPER

Let us not underestimate the power of online persuasive techniques used to spread fake news (Too good to be true? It probably is, Aug 25)

Manipulators are good at spreading lies among the masses and then presenting themselves as the people's protector. Obviously, their purpose is to exploit and mobilise the masses, while cleverly concealing evidence and facts about their true identity and ulterior motive.

And, the exponential rate at which technology advances today provides them with an environment conducive to achieve their mission at lightning speed.

The damage as planned by the manipulators would have been done by the time their true identity and goal are exposed.

It is extremely rare for a victim (regardless of academic and professional background) to realise that he has been manipulated into their way of thinking.

The Protection from Online Falsehood and Manipulation Act is necessary but not sufficient. We shouldn't be too quick to believe an impressive advertisement (or a persuasive statement) as the truth without first knowing the true identity and credibility of its originator(s).

Scammers will not reveal their ulterior motive, while a traditional media agency has no choice but to comply with its corporate governance system.

As long as traditional media agencies remain responsible, accountable and answerable for their advertisements and publications, people's trust in them will not be eroded.

In order to ensure success, everyone, as a rule of thumb, must do his part to be inquisitive about advertisements and publications that are "too good to be true".

S. Ratnakumar