Online not best approach to teach sex etiquette


Students at the National University of Singapore have started taking a compulsory module on Respect and Consent Culture either online or at a 90-minute workshop.
Students at the National University of Singapore have started taking a compulsory module on Respect and Consent Culture either online or at a 90-minute workshop.PHOTO: ST FILE

Forcing undergraduates to take courses on sexual consent will not arrest the problem of sexual misconduct and it will not help to change behaviour (Courses at unis to educate students on sexual consent, Aug 25).

The Straits Times report noted that students have the option to take the course online. This merely pulls focus from the need for more meaningful action. Instead, face-to-face training delivered by experts would be more suitable. The universities are doing this but more can be done to enhance such workshops by engaging more professional trainers to cover a wider spectrum of the student population.

The correct approach must be community-based because a one-off module is far from sufficient to affect widespread and systemic changes within a university. This must be a multi-faceted campaign. Providing opportunities for personal participation and engagement is best.

In fact, education on sexual consent and ethics must start at a younger age.

It should be treated as a lifelong learning endeavour if we hope to generate meaningful change over the long term.

Cheng Choon Fei